I'm an african-canadian who lives in the city of Cap Rouge, in the new great town of Quebec City. I'm an expert (Ph.D.) in communication, informatics communauties, business intelligence and international marketing. This site is a place where I share my knowledges and where I want receive the comments of my knowledge partners to, finally, enhance mine.

samedi, décembre 18, 2004

Situated learning and communities of practices

La livraison suivante reflète mon regard sur ce que je fais dans le laboratoire de recherche dans lequel je me suis engagé pour comprendre le cœur de la mutation sociale qui nous affecte: le déploiement du paradigme de l'informationnalisme (Castells). Les théories qui sous-tendent les recherches sur la co-construction du savoir et l'avénement de dynamiques communautaires salvatrices, celles du socio-constructivisme, représentent le point de vue par lequel les membres du laboratoire voit les dynamique de construction de l'intelligence collective.

Lecture: Lave et Wenger
http://www.cefrio.qc.ca/pdf/Étienne_Wenger_Seminaire_2005.pdf

http://museumlearning.com/scripts/search_display.php?Ref_ID=1173

Overview: http://tip.psychology.org/lave.html

Lave argues that learning as it normally occurs is a function of the activity, context and culture in which it occurs (i.e., it is situated). This contrasts with most classroom learning activities which involve knowledge which is abstract and out of context. Social interaction is a critical component of situated learning -- learners become involved in a "community of practice" which embodies certain beliefs and behaviors to be acquired. As the beginner or newcomer moves from the periphery of this community to its center, they become more active and engaged within the culture and hence assume the role of expert or old-timer. Furthermore, situated learning is usually unintentional rather than deliberate. These ideas are what Lave & Wenger (1991) call the process of "legitimate peripheral participation ."
Other researchers have further developed the theory of situated learning. Brown, Collins & Duguid (1989) emphasize the idea of cognitive apprenticeship: "Cognitive apprenticeship supports learning in a domain by enabling students to acquire, develop and use cognitive tools in authentic domain activity. Learning, both outside and inside school, advances through collaborative social interaction and the social construction of knowledge." Brown et al. also emphasize the need for a new epistemology for learning -- one that emphasizes active perception over concepts and representation. Suchman (1988) explores the situated learning framework in the context of artificial intelligence.
Situated learning has antecedents in the work of Gibson (theory of affordances) and Vygotsky (social learning). In addition, the theory of Schoenfeld on mathematical problem solving embodies some of the critical elements of situated learning framework.
Scope/Application:
Situated learning is a general theory of knowledge acquisition . It has been applied in the context of technology-based learning activities for schools that focus on problem-solving skills (Cognition & Technology Group at Vanderbilt, 1993). McLellan (1995) provides a collection of articles that describe various perspectives on the theory.
Example:
Lave & Wenger (1991) provide an analysis of situated learning in five different settings: Yucatec midwives, native tailors, navy quartermasters, meat cutters and alcoholics. In all cases, there was a gradual acquisition of knowledge and skills as novices learned from experts in the context of everyday activities.
Principles:
1. Knowledge needs to be presented in an authentic context, i.e., settings and applications that would normally involve that knowledge.
2. Learning requires social interaction and collaboration.
References:
Brown, J.S., Collins, A. & Duguid, S. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18(1), 32-42.
Cognition & Technology Group at Vanderbilt (March 1993). Anchored instruction and situated cognition revisited. Educational Technology, 33(3), 52-70.
Lave, J. (1988). Cognition in Practice: Mind, mathematics, and culture in everyday life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1990). Situated Learning: Legitimate Periperal Participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
McLellan, H. (1995). Situated Learning Perspectives. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.
Suchman, L. (1988). Plans and Situated Actions: The Problem of Human/Machine Communication. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Relevant Web Sites:

For more about Lave and situated learning, see

http://scottlab.human.waseda.ac.jp/situated.html

http://www.infed.org/biblio/communities_of_practice.htm